Viva Highlights: London Fashion Week Spring 2019

The Viva fashion team highlight their favourite shows from London Spring 2019 runway shows


1/9

BURBERRY

"It was interesting seeing what Riccardo Tisci did for his first collection as creative director of Burberry. For the last 12 years at Givenchy, the designer was known for his trend-defining pieces; gothic-inspired couture, a penchant for religious iconography and an ability to combine streetwear and high fashion. He also positioned Givenchy as a red carpet favourite amoung celebrities like Beyonce, Kim Kardashian and Madonna. For his first show with Burberry, Riccardo simultaneously stayed true to the fashion house's heritage roots while injecting his signature sex appeal into the mammoth 134-look collection. Elegant refinement, punks, working girls and boys, street wear and evening wear all made appearances in a show that spanned an exploration of England's 'tribes'. While I was initially skeptical about whether Riccardo would be a good fit for the British brand, I'm now convinced he will steer Burberry in a new, bold direction." — Rosie.

Photo / Getty Images

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

"The 40s through an 80s lens was how post show notes described the New Zealander’s elegant collection. This red short suit is one of my favourites from the entire London Fashion Week Circuit. Mildred Pierce meets Working Girl with broad shouldered suiting making a welcome change of pace in amongst Emilia’s signature dresses and gowns. While the designer does a great floral print each season, her bold use of colour is worth noting, selecting the perfect shades of primary tones such as yellow and red to lift the collections, and providing plenty of inspiration for visual merchandisers in the process." — Dan.

Photo / Getty Images

RICHARD QUINN

"While it must've been a challenge to try and follow up having the Queen attend his Fall 2018 show earlier this year, this season Richard Quinn used the spotlight earned from that newsworthy show to invite schoolchildren and students of Central Saint Martins to inhabit his front row seats. "At a time where real damage is occurring to arts education, I want to point to how substantially its creative power lights the path to our future,” he explained. “Arts subjects are under threat in secondary schools in England, yet they are they are a foundation of our 32 billion fashion industry.” Clothing-wise, Richard showed an evolution of his skill as a print-designer and his penchant for subverting glamour — as with his last shows, the first models came out in body-covering masks, this time in black like a sinister shadow. Following that were 20s-style beaded flapper dresses and his signature impactful prints and proportions." — Rosie.

Photo / Getty Images

ERDEM

"The idea of gender fluidity in fashion isn’t new. Erdem Moralioglu’s Spring 2019 collection inspired by cross-dressers of the Victorian era was a reminder of the way people dressed at their own whims during less forgiving times. “It was the idea of people in a very conservative time dressing to be who they were and who they felt they were fundamentally,” said the designer, post-show. There’s an element of drama here of course, with plenty of theatrical costuming referencing the period, however when you extract each piece, there’s plenty for the Erdem customer to covet, the kind of clothes they’ve come to know and love from the label — extravagant textiles including velvet, brocade and lace, fashioned into deceptively modern separates for both day and evening wear.” — Dan.

Photo / Getty Images

ALEXA CHUNG

"While avant garde, artistic fashion is inspiring and important, there’s something to be said for collections that are wearable for the average person. Alexa Chung showed for the first time at London Fashion Week this season, and her collection riffed on seventies-style everyday classics with a holiday spin — think two-pieces, effortless dresses and overalls. Some of my favourite looks include waistcoats and matching trousers over a silk shirt (is this the return of the vest?) and a white semi-sheer crochet dress that’s dying to be thrown over a bikini. Alexa has done well to capitalise on the mass-appeal of her personal style; one gets the feeling she’s designing as much for herself as anybody else. And what’s so wrong with that?" — Rosie.

Photo / Getty Images

VICTORIA BECKHAM

“Everyone goes on about how Victoria Beckham isn’t a real designer and how she’s a clever marketer. While it might upset the fashion purists out there (read snobs), there’s no denying she’s built a successful brand focusing on clothes that aren’t necessarily pushing the envelope, but rather, reflect the times we live in — and there's nothing wrong with that. While everyone is lamenting Phoebe Philo’s absence since her departure from Celine, much has been noted about the brand VB stepping up to the plate as a female designer creating clothes for modern, upwardly mobile women — and for that reason her elegant 10th anniversary collection, coupled with the recent appointment of a new CEO, proved to the naysayers that she’s in it for the long haul, highlighting remarkable coats and jackets, elegant day wear and handbags that aren’t too precious." — Dan.

Photo / Getty Images

REJINA PYO

"Every collection of Rejina Pyo’s I see, I really like. Her clothes are the type of thing women feel good in and want to wear, and this collection is no different. Full of bright, zesty colours interspersed with polkadots, stripes, gingham and floral prints, this season Rejina has done separates well; breezy short-sleeved shirts to be belted or half-tucked, easy skirts and pastel summer suits sit nicely alongside both casual and statement-making dresses. As always, there are many fun accessories in there including her signature covetable handbags, joined by floppy sunhats and great shoes. Pieces like these are easy to imagine slotting effortlessly into an existing closet to be instantly added to daily rotation — if my wardrobe comprised entirely of this collection, I wouldn’t be mad." — Rosie.

Photo / Getty Images

SIMONE ROCHA

"Unlike other designers, Simone Rocha tends to stick to her knitting with the same riff each season of historically inspired dresses and luxurious jackets. It’s what her customers want, and for a still fairly small label, that’s not a terrible idea. I love her attention to detail and for this collection she acknowledged her Chinese heritage, looking to 16th century Tang Dynasty from her father’s side while marinating the Irish influences she’s inherited through her mother and business partner Odette. The contrast between the two worlds she’s grown up with between Hong Kong and Ireland provides a refreshing insight into the brand’s DNA every season. Highlights included silk duchess cocktail dresses and scarlet hued dresses with delicate embroidery.” — Dan.

Photo / Getty Images

EMILIA WICKSTEAD

"She might be known for her impeccably elegant dresses favoured by the Duchess of Cambridge, among many, but Emilia Wickstead proved this season that she knows how to cut a mean suit. The New Zealand-born designer opened her Spring/Summer 2019 show with broad-shouldered two-pieces in white and camel, paired with big hair bows and square leather briefcases. It seems Emilia's woman is encouraged to take up space and be noticed this season with the wide silhouettes of her suiting and coats and dresses in bright shades of orange, green and fuschia. She's putting her own, immaculate spin on power dressing, and I'm a fan." — Rosie.

Photo / Getty Images

Share this article:
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

Subscribe to E-Newsletter