Our Favourite Looks From Paris Fashion Week Menswear Spring/Summer 2019

We pick our highlights from the week that was. Au Revoir!


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Issey Miyake

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Issey Miyake

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Rick Owens

Guests received black masks with the details of the event stamped on the outside as an invitation. Before the models even came out the previously gospel setting of Palais de Tokyo was erupted in blue smoke. The collection was entitled Basel, in reference to the tower in the old testament, and the clothing was heavenly.

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Rick Owens

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Rick Owens

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Yohji Yamamoto

Yamamoto’s fans expect the avant garde designer to produce a masterclass every season - it’s a good thing that the master tailor rarely disappoints. This collection featured many cult-favourites, such as pieces with zips and print pieces featuring Japanese motifs.

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Yohji Yamamoto

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Yohji Yamamoto

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Dries Van Noten

Working in collaboration the show featured 60’s Danish interior designer Verner Panton, with psychedelic inspired looks repeated throughout the show. Colour palettes of blues, reds, whites and golds dyed the experimental prints, with the grasping hand print another favourite.

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Dries Van Noten

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Dries Van Noten

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Junya Watanabe

Watanabe’s collection mixed equal parts practical with style. Wide cut trousers aided the utilitarian silhouette that has come to define Watanabe’s style, as upcoming sneaker collaborations were also previewed.

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Junya Watanabe

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Junya Watanabe

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Boramy Viguier

Up-and-comer Boramy Viguier worked under the helm of Lanvin menswear designer Lucas Ossendrijver for four years before launching his label last year. The 28-year-old shows much promise as he transformed Paris into a mystical Tarot card inspired dystopia, where concealed cowboys run wild.

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Boramy Viguier

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Boramy Viguier

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Ann Demeulemeester

The Belgian fashion house presented a moving presentation, the dark, ghostly figures a direct contrast to the sunny Paris setting outside. Anonymous, faceless models drifted through an eerie atmosphere as traditional folk songs echoed throughout, helping set the scene.

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Ann Demeulemeester

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Ann Demeulemeester

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Comme des Garcons HOMME Plus

While the suit has been a typically repetitive feature of menswear, designer Rei Kawakubo treated the sacred 3-piece the same way the rest of the industry is treating sneakers. Dubbed “Crazy Suits”, the CDG show this year was a light and at times humorous take on the predictability of tailoring in menswear.

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Comme des Garcons HOMME Plus

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Comme des Garcons HOMME Plus

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Alexander McQueen

We love luxury sneakers, but we're pleased to see an intentional absence at the British label's show. Designer Sarah Burton provided a truly elegant show with some great leather pieces (including the much beloved Chelsea boot).

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Alexander McQueen

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Alexander McQueen

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Sacai

As have many before her, Japanese designer Chitose Abe took on the challenge of deconstructing something already completed, and turning it new. Maybe the most notable example of this were the winter blankets, previously produced by American textile manufacturing company Pendleton, being transformed into light spring outerwear. Another highlight was the preview into an upcoming Nike sneaker collaboration.

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Sacai

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Sacai

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Thom Browne

The American designer threw us a curveball this week, as he neglected his usual grey colour palette and went over the rainbow in a very light-hearted, fun-natured show. Gnomes in shorts and blazers mowed the lawns outside of their gnome house in the middle of the runway, as models in oversized coats with lobster prints trodded along.

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Thom Browne

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Thom Browne

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Dior

Kim Jones made his debut at Dior with a show to be remembered. The walk was centered around a 10 meter tall effigy of Mr. Dior himself (and his dog, bobby), composed of 70,000 roses courtesy of street artist Kaws. Jones’ decided to drop the 'Homme' from the label's branding, and weaved his feminine designs into graceful silk shirts and floral motifs.

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Dior

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Dior

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Hermes

Sophisticated, timeless, elegant - Hermes produced another spectacle for the wealthy CEO in all of us. Highlighting sharp suits, side bags and sandals, the collection oozed money and sex.

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Hermes

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Hermes

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Balmain

32-year-old designer Olivier Rousteing cited Michael Jackson as one of the most prominent influences in his mammoth, 110 look runway show. The popstar's influence could be seen as leather jackets and gloves hit the catwalk, as well as album artwork from the singer's albums adapted into Balmain’s own prints.

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Balmain

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Balmain

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Christian Dada

Designer Masanori Zoo Morikawa credited Japanese photographer Nobuyoshi Araki’s 1991 work “Laments Skyscapes/Laments From Close-range” as his key influence. The book itself is a work made from mourning, as the photographer's wife had passed away a year before publishing. This made for an emotional show as Morikawa’s pieces reflected Araki’s work through motifs of cobwebs in the transperant knitwear and smears on many of the dress shirts and pants.

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Christian Dada

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Christian Dada

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Alyx

American designer Matthew Williams made his runway debut in Paris this week, after having his clothing on the backs of Instagram cool kids for the best part of a year now. The designer also assisted Kim Jones for his Dior show.

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Alyx

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Alyx

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Kenzo

The show’s design notes read as follows: “Kindness. Balance. Unity. Harmony”. Rounding off Fashion Week with an optimistic spirit. Models were dressed in playful silhouettes and cheerful colours as they strutted to live funk.

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Kenzo

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Kenzo

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GmbH

Berlin label GmbH addressed immigration issues on the world stage, with their season titled “Survival Strategies”. The collection featured practical outdoor wear, harnesses with buckles and PVC used on the pants and shoes. Paying homage to their hometown, skin tight sportswear looks reflected the Berlin club scene.

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GmbH

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GmbH

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OFF-WHITE

Virgil Abloh preceded his debut work with Louis Vuitton with the rebel inspired ”JIM STARK” collection. The show was every part American as it was street, with references to graffiti, the subway, and even as far as cultural icon Bart Simpson.

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OFF-WHITE

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OFF-WHITE

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ACNE Studios

The Scandinavian label focused on bright, high-visibility outdoor wear and executed it with a nomadic aesthetic. There were also themes of reconstruction and misinterpretation, such as the trenchcoat with the polo shirt collar.

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ACNE Studios

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ACNE Studios

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OAMC

Canadian designer Luke Meier has deep ties in the streetwear community and they showed in his brand, OAMC’s Paris runway show. The clothing was outer-space inspired, a minimalistic collection that reflected his work with Jil Sander.

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OAMC

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OAMC

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UNDERCOVER

Japanese cult brand UNDERCOVER presented a show revolved around the idea of imaginary bands. Eight bands were invented, and what we saw were the loyal followings of each band, each with their own die-hard mentality. Goths, cyber punks and motorcycle gangs were all recognized as a fictional Japanese underbelly invaded Paris.

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UNDERCOVER

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UNDERCOVER

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AMI

Set amongst the background of a very Stephen King inspired corn field, the Parisian brand offset otherwise country influenced looks with sportswear pieces and smart tailoring.

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AMI

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AMI

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Issey Miyake

The Japanese designer's notes read: “inspired by the desire for light and of ‘lightness’”. Cool and collected was the name of the game as clean, minimal but sleek pieces graced the stage, blending the designer’s Japanese heritage with the brand's Parisian identity.

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